Popular bottled water brands contain toxic ‘forever chemicals,’ Consumer Reports finds

Americans drink more bottled water than coffee, tea, milk, soft drinks or any other beverage — billions of gallons a year in all, according to industry statistics. That impressive thirst has drawn scrutiny about what’s in the bottle. Consumer Reports recently tested 47 bottled waters — including 35 noncarbonated and 12 carbonated options — and found levels of “toxic PFAS chemicals” in several popular brands that were above a limit recommended by some experts.
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Skip the Plastic Wrap. 5 Chic, Reusable Food-Storage Alternatives

YOU’VE SPENT a lot of time in the kitchen the last seven months, cooking more and storing more—from leftover lasagna to the hunk of extra mozzarella it didn’t call for. Most likely you reflexively used what’s known in the waste-management world as plastic film—Glad wraps, Hefty Baggies, shopping and produce bags from the grocery store—very little of which gets salvaged.
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Why ‘biodegradable’ isn’t what you think – NYT

Choosing products with packaging that claims to be “biodegradable” or “compostable” might mean that they degrade only under special conditions, and could complicate recycling efforts, said Jason Locklin, the director of the New Materials Institute at the University of Georgia. “Itʼs tremendously confusing, not just to the consumer, but even to many scientists,” he said.
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There is hope.  Awareness about the dangers of plastics is on the rise and the recognition that more research needs to be done is growing exponentially.

Most plastics eventually degrade into very small particles called microplastics.  A comprehensive review of scientific evidence published by the European Union’s Scientific Advice Mechanism in 2019 revealed that microplastics are now present in every part of the environment.  This means that they are in the air we breathe, in the food we eat, and in the water we drink.  There is great concern that these microplastic particles and the toxic materials they carry may have adverse effects on human health.  To date, limited scientific studies have addressed this issue, leaving us in the dark about the real dangers of microplastics. 
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Plastic AND Paper bags Banned From N.J. Supermarkets

Paper or plastic? In New Jersey, try neither. The state Legislature on Thursday voted to make New Jersey the first in the country to bansingle-use paper bags in supermarkets along with all single-use plastic bags in stores andrestaurants.Eight other states, including California, New York and Vermont, have bans on single-useplastic bags either in effect now or scheduled to go into effect in the coming years.
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Recycling Plastic Clamshells and Bottles, the Same but Different

You’ve probably seen the #1 recycling symbol on various plastic containers when you’re sorting your recycling. Those containers are made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), also known as polyester. Because PET is strong, lightweight, and easily molded, it is a popular material for packaging a wide range of foods and consumer goods.
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Big Oil – flooding Africa with plastics

Confronting a climate crisis that threatens the fossil fuel industry, oil companies are racing to make more plastic. But they face two problems: Many markets are already awash with plastic, and few countries are willing to be dumping grounds for the world’s plastic waste.The industry thinks it has found a solution to both problems in Africa.
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