Study raises questions about plastic pollution’s effect on heart health

We breathe, eat and drink tiny particles of plastic. But are these minuscule specks in the body harmless, dangerous or somewhere in between? A small study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine raises more questions than it answers about how these bits — microplastics and the smaller nanoplastics — might affect the heart.
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California Tried to Ban Plastic Grocery Bags. It Didn’t Work.

Almost a decade ago, California became the first state in the United States to ban single-use plastic bags in an effort to tackle an intractable plastic waste problem. Then came the reusable, heavy-duty plastic bags, offered to shoppers for ten cents. Designed to withstand dozens of uses, and technically recyclable, many retailers treated them as exempt from the ban.
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‘Pointless’ pet product found on store shelves sparks outrage among customers: ‘How hard is it …’

Think single-use water bottles are wasteful? Brace yourself — they even exist for dogs. A Reddit user shared a short video of the product, showing water — yes, just water — packaged in disposable plastic bowls. The bowl, for sale at Target, features a label that reads: “[Ready to drink] bowled water for pets. Simply peel off the lid and serve your pet clean water anytime, anywhere.”
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Bottled water contains thousands of nanoplastics, new study shows. How can you avoid them?

Scientists from Columbia University are raising alarm bells about the amount of small flecks of plastic — known as nanoplastics — in bottled drinking water. Their research, which was published on Jan. 8 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that three popular plastic water bottle brands (which went unnamed in the research) had 10 to 100 times greater amounts of nanoplastics than previously estimated.
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People Are Ditching Their Plastic Cutting Boards Because of a (Disturbing) Study

Plastic is everywhere. From the food we eat to the air we breathe, tiny particles of plastic — also known as “microplastics” — can be found in almost anything. Not only does plastic cause real havoc on our oceans and take centuries to decay, causing even more of an environmental crisis, but toxicologists have questioned whether consuming microplastics can negatively impact health. Especially if there are pieces of plastic you’re using on a regular basis, like say your handy-dandy plastic cutting board.
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